The Envelope ✈

Aviation, 80's pop culture, vintage.

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theenergyissue:

Nature vs. The Internet: How Google Protects Its Undersea Cables from Shark Attacks
Footage from a recent survey of Google’s undersea fiber-optic cables revealed that shark bites are a very real threat to global telecommunications. Indeed, a Google spokesperson noted that the company actually coats its cables in a Kevlar-like material to protect against sharks. Interestingly, sharks seem to have more of a taste for fiber-optic cables than the old-fashioned coaxial copper wires. A report from the United Nations Environment Programme and International Cable Protection Committee Ltd. speculates that sharks may be "encouraged by electromagnetic fields from a suspended cable strumming in currents." In other words, sharks, which can sense electromagnetic fields, may mistake the cables for live prey. The phenomenon highlights the ways in which technology and nature can intersect, and the strange new interconnections between the energy of the natural world and our man-made grids. 

really disappointed that google isn’t patrolling thousands of miles of cables with submarines ready to shoo away sharks with a robotic arm.

theenergyissue:

Nature vs. The Internet: How Google Protects Its Undersea Cables from Shark Attacks

Footage from a recent survey of Google’s undersea fiber-optic cables revealed that shark bites are a very real threat to global telecommunications. Indeed, a Google spokesperson noted that the company actually coats its cables in a Kevlar-like material to protect against sharks. Interestingly, sharks seem to have more of a taste for fiber-optic cables than the old-fashioned coaxial copper wires. A report from the United Nations Environment Programme and International Cable Protection Committee Ltd. speculates that sharks may be "encouraged by electromagnetic fields from a suspended cable strumming in currents." In other words, sharks, which can sense electromagnetic fields, may mistake the cables for live prey. The phenomenon highlights the ways in which technology and nature can intersect, and the strange new interconnections between the energy of the natural world and our man-made grids. 

really disappointed that google isn’t patrolling thousands of miles of cables with submarines ready to shoo away sharks with a robotic arm.

(Source: popsci.com, via jet-girl)

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elevenis-my-doctor:

whatthefuckdidyoulanadelsay:

kingofsaigone:

tinselkin:

aberrantkenosis:

in case you ever wanted to know what mambo number 5 sounds like with all the instruments (including the drums) replaced with bike horns 

it sounds like the song is going to kill you and it’s perfect

image

i smiled through the whole thing because i just don’t understand what would compell someone to do this but thanks

i cannojt bretahe

i fucking hate you bobby

(Source: tag-hanamonogatari, via hanbl)